Saturday, April 11, 2009

Thailand- By Kevin(MARCO POLO) Roberts


Ko Samui, Thailand
Back to Ko Samui, Thailand. You can see why I would want to stay. Notice how calm the sea is. Just like a lake. And that's the big Buddha off in the distance. The Hindu-ish Buddha. Today was the first of three sea days. We got our tails kicked today. Two captain's parties (where he introduces all of the department heads) then two shows. And the new musical director is going to wear us out. She's a show player and uncomfortable just playing standards. So we play charts on everything. The MD before was a good jazz piano player so on nights when we had to play so much, he'd play tunes and maybe one of us would play the melody and solo on each one and the other guys could rest. You might end up playing on one or two songs per set. That ain't gonna happen with this girl. She's the type that does nothing on the fly. We played an half our of big band music and then went straight into the production show. Twice. And the first show was a real drag because she got the tempos too slow and everything seemed to drag along. But the singers must have said something to her. (Plus the rest of the band took the new drummer aside and told him to push all of the tempos.) Whatever happened, it worked because the second show was much better. We had got an hour back last night and another one tonight. I had to set my system clock to Yekaterinburg, Russia to get the correct hour. Never even heard of it! And the whole band is off tomorrow except for the bassist and drummer. Who are going to get THEIR tails kicked tomorrow. By one of the true prima-donna concert pianists working ships. I thought the last guys that worked with him were going to quit after that one. 'Around the World with Naki Ataman.' I never realized the world was so big until I heard that show. Ciao...KR

Darryl Lavigne

video

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

FROM Russia with LOVE

video

Looking forward to citizenship

Tuesday, October 28, 2008

DEA trouble

A former agent with the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration in Atlanta was sentenced Thursday to 21 months in prison for failing to report cash income for 2004.

Gregory Campion, 38, now of Orlando, Fla., was also sentenced by U.S. District Judge Jack T. Camp to perform 100 hours of community service. The sentence was increased because Judge Camp found that a substantial portion of the unreported income came from illegal activity, which was not contested. Specifically, Campion did not contest the Government’s evidence that the funds were stolen from drug money seized in narcotics investigations.

Between 2003 and 2005 Campion was an assistant supervisor at a DEA task force office in Atlanta, where he had access to millions of dollars of cash seized from suspected drug traffickers. Several seizures conducted during this time were “short,” meaning the final amount counted by the bank was thousands of dollars less than the original amount seized.

During 2004, Campion deposited more than $200,000 in cash in his accounts, none of which was reported as income on his tax returns. He had been placed on administrative leave in 2005, and resigned his position at DEA when he pleaded guilty to the federal charge. Campion was indicted in March 2006, and pleaded guilty in March 2008 to tax evasion.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

Saturday, September 27, 2008

Thursday, July 17, 2008

Don Coleman back on the SCENE: LEGENDS

Yes,

He is back on the scene and it took Terry Thomas to do it! We also had James Williams, Betty, Marg, George Thomas, Carmouche, and a host of other Jazz fans, not to mention Dancing the Line. THERE WAS A LIVE VOCAL CLINIC TAUGHT BY HORACE YOUNG , HOSTED BY THE JAZZ INSTITUTE .

ALSO. COME BACK ON WEDNESDAY 7-12 FOR SIT-INS THURSDAY JULY 24,2008
6-11 AT
LEGEND JAZZ CAFE
video1004 NORTH SAN JACINTO
In foreground is Valerie.

Tuesday, July 15, 2008

Intelligence?

I've been tinkering with OpenCyc yet again, along with putting together the framework for a chatbot system.My idea is as follows:
Get a word list that allows me to reference the parts of speech for any english word.
Create a system which parses words, sentences, paragraphs, pages, chapters, and books (conceptual, just a large number of related chapters.)
Record the valid structures for each construct (sentences, paragraphs, etc.) Each type of sentence will be correlated to a particular Cyc microtheory. This will allow me to assign a meta-data tag to any given sentence that is known. A Microtheory is a concept in the Cyc ontology system that encapsulates particular ideas that may be factually or semantically different than other concepts. Think of inheritance and polymorphism, but utilized to create a heirarchical view of the world, using hundreds of thousands of basic common sense concepts and millions of assertions related to those concepts. It allows an AI system to use the proper granularity for arbitrary contexts, by drawing on inferences, hypotheses, and static data.The problem with most chatbots is lack of real intelligent flexibility. You can create a billion template/response structures and your bot will imitate intelligent conversation, but what you're really doing is an if/then routine over and over again. It takes only 3 degrees of separation between the original input and confusing the 'natural' train of thought before you hit the limitations of most chatbots based on this structure.However, training a bot over time on actual conversation has some serious drawbacks as well. You end up with rules being created on the fly that may be entirely wrong, with no way of preventing it unless you edit the data manually.My solution is to semantically tag valid english sentence structures, and assign a particular microtheory to each tag, or class of tags. By using those tags in Cyc microtheories, telling the system what questions it has to answer about particular sentences in order to 'understand' them, I can create an input parser that takes any given english sentences and store them as semantically valid data constructs.Once stored, I will again turn to Cyc and classify sentence types, and potential 'proper' responses for particular sentence classes. Statements, queries, imperatives, and so on will each have responses appropriate to their semantic data. I will program responses and link the response categories to each sentence class.So I have a concept for a chatbot system which can take arbitrary (syntactically valid) english sentences, understand them by linking them to an ontological database and creating new concepts as necessary, and return a response based on the actual content of the sentence.I've gotten a few Cyc microtheories drawn up. I have a 210,000 word 'parts of speech' database. What I need now is ideas for large quantities of text which I can parse to get as broad a range as possible for sentence, paragraph, page, chapter, and book structures.Does anyone know where I can find really large corpora?A potential offshoot of this is classification of corpora, and using each class as inputs in a neural net, in order to train patterns specific to styles of writing and genre... so you could create a microtheory that described a story, and have the chatbot output a novel. Given a large enough corpus, you could train on particular authors' styles of writing. I would of course market this software, make millions of dollars, and take over the world.Anyway, what I'm looking for is ideas as to where to look for parsable data. I'd need structured content, like news articles, books, and so on. The only hardcoding I'm going to do is for things like predictive spellchecking for unknown words, and dealing with broad classes of inputs and responses. I'm hoping that such a system would be able to handle specific inputs and outputs dynamically, and easily pass the Turing test.I'm also considering IRC logs, chatroom logs, and other "conversation" corpora, but those present problems such as slang, deliberate misspellings, horrible grammar, and extreme ambiguity. I think I should leap one hurdle at a time... so the first is a consistent, pre-edited, dry corpus.

Saturday, June 21, 2008

NB jazz in new york : Buy subscriptions. In NY selling Jazz


Welcome to Jazz in July 2008! For two weeks, swing with the sounds of George Shearing, Billy Strayhorn, Leonard Bernstein and Brazilian jazz, and the thrilling performances of the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, Dr. Billy Taylor, Kurt Elling, Freddy Cole, Fred Hersch and many others. The cool sounds of jazz never sounded so red-hot!
·

Concerts
Somewhere: The Songs of Leonard Bernstein
Bill Charlap, pianoKurt Elling, vocalsBrian Lynch, trumpetJimmy Greene, tenor saxophone

Jon Gordon, alto saxophone

Ted Rosenthal, pianoPeter Washington, bassKenny Washington, drums
Tue, Jul 22, 2008, 8:00pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
Piano Jam
Bill Charlap, pianoDr. Billy Taylor, piano

Cedar Walton, piano

Bill Mays, piano Warren Vaché, cornetSandy Stewart, vocalsPeter Washington, bassEddie Locke, drums
Wed, Jul 23, 2008, 8:00pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street

Jazz Piano Master Class
Bill Charlap, pianoTed Rosenthal, pianoSean Smith, bassParticipants to be announced.
Mon, Jul 28, 2008, 8:15pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
Jazz Samba!
Bill Charlap, pianoVera Mara, vocalsClaudio Roditi, trumpetHarry Allen, tenor saxophoneDario Eskenazi, pianoDavid Finck, bassSandro Albert, guitarAdriano Santos, drumsMauro Refosco, percussion
Tue, Jul 29, 2008, 8:00pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
The Shearing Sound: A Tribute to George Shearing
Bill Charlap, pianoFred Hersch, pianoFreddy Cole, vocalsJoe Locke, vibesPeter Bernstein, guitarSean Smith, bass

Kenny Washington, drumsDaniel Sadownick, percussion
Wed, Jul 30, 2008, 8:00pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
Lush Life: Billy Strayhorn
Bill Charlap, pianoCarol Sloane, vocals

Frank Wess, tenor saxophone

Terell Stafford, trumpet

Mulgrew Miller, piano

Russell Malone, guitarPeter Washington, bassWillie Jones III, drums
Thu, Jul 31, 2008, 8:00pm, Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
The Jazz in July series at the Y is generously supported by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation and is partially endowed by a generous gift from Simona and Jerome A. Chazen.

Take out the names that are highlighted and let Da Camera or someone sponsor the group.

None of us are getting younger go see Frank West, Billy Taylor,

Monday, May 12, 2008

Discernment?

I am blessed with what I thought was discernment on a spiritual level. Well I am unless I let my emotion creep in as evidenced of the last few wives. Well guess what had to go?. The same thing is true for a diagnosis. Given a good doctor and a good exam you can discern a group of symptoms to come up with a diagnosis. What would prove better would be to avoid the thing that is causing the cancerous growth when it is at the two or less cellular stage. Such dietary changes as low fat/ no sugar would avoid /prevent and treat some early dysfunctions of immuno- surveillance, as well as diminish cardiovascular mishaps (MI/Stroke) This is the job of the cancer markers of the future to come up with. This is another case against fossil fuels. One can avoid cancer in some cases by avoiding coming into contact with them. This will be the next “ cigarette Harm” for the lawyers to run up big bills for themselves in class action suits.

Nevertheless, we do have certain cancer markers that can point one to a suspicion of growths that are not supposed to be there CEA, for GI, PSA and . The question is what do you do with the information? At this point would there be any benefit other than enrichment of HMO/ hospital CEOs to surgery , radiotherapy or chemotherapy ? Would there be any benefit to anything else.

Not if you did not know about it!

Immunotherapy with vaccines, receptor blockers, and cytokine manipulation does hold out much hope, especially for the leukemias, and for pancreatic and renal cancers.. There is hope on the way. Pray for the medical-industrial syndrome including the state medical boards and pro-consumer group participants and that we learn to avoid exposure to carcinogens similar to the best cure for HIV in avoiding the virus that causes disease.

Peters MD 5-12-08

Here from a recent article and in bold 3 new markers ( found including one dealing with glutathione.) TRIM 63 glutathione S-transferase A1 and alanyl aminopeptidase are the three enzymes. Such things as radio-tagging and MRI may give the answer quicker.

Get out my life_____

Replace the embolded with Whatever you want . Liquor, Weed, being broke

Get out my life, woman; you don't love me no more
Get out my life, woman; you don't love me no more

Get out my eyes, teardrops; I gotta see my way around
Get out my eyes, teardrops; I gotta see my way around
Get out my life, heartache; nothin' but heartache by the pound

Get off the ladder, woman; I've got to climb up to the top
Get off the ladder, woman; I've got to climb up to the top
Get off the ladder, woman; there is nothin' gonna make me stop

Get out my way, woman; I gotta be movin' on
Get out the way, woman; I gotta be movin' on
Get out the way, woman; I gotta be movin' on

(repeat verse 1

Austinite with Houston Number, or HSJ whichever first

It just so happens that I can post the wedding present when the mediocre singing average bass playing porcupine personality is put into management status. I did not say I was the groom. I just own the present
for signing with ......... Should a man marry for talent, beauty, money or ....
No not me silly! I have enough wives!

http://www.guppiesfromouterspace.com